Home Tag "victims"

The Challenges of Domestic Violence Investigations

Every officer has been there: The dispatcher calls out for someone to take a domestic violence call, only to meet with silence over the radio as officers hope someone else will volunteer. A few officers coincidentally log themselves out on extra patrols, special assignments, or meal breaks. Others scramble to find something else to do that they could argue takes precedence.

Apart from a rape or decomposing body, domestic violence calls are often one of the least favorite calls for officers to handle. Domestic violence investigations are much different than any other type of police investigation. The intrinsic difficulties of domestic situations, especially recurring ones, can be stressful on officers who enjoy more clear-cut calls for service. Here are ways officers can be better prepared for these calls for service.

Strong Teamwork Needed to Solve Violent Crimes

Despite what fictional crime dramas portray, violent crimes are never solved by a lone detective or a crime-sleuthing duo. Investigating violent crimes—and specifically homicides—requires extensive teamwork. AMU criminal justice professor Nicole Cain writes about the professionals involved in solving crimes including first responders, detectives, crime scene investigators, forensic scientists, medical examiners and more. Learn more about how these professionals have to work together to solve crimes.

Corrections System Fails Female Prisoners: One Woman’s Story

The number of females in prison, jail, and probation populations has grown at a considerably faster rate than males. Despite this growth, the correctional system is failing to address the rehabilitation needs of women during and after incarceration. AMU professor Michael Pittaro talks to one former inmate about her experience in the prison system and the support she's received now that she's on parole.

Unequal Disciplinary Actions for Officers After Shooting Deaths

In recent months, the news has been rife with stories about police officers shooting and killing civilians. While each incident has unique aspects, there are also commonalities. One question that remains unanswered by the law enforcement community is: If an investigation finds no criminal behavior by the victim, should disciplinary action be taken against the officer(s)? AMU professor Gary Minor examines this question and draws comparisons between two similar incidents that have very different outcomes for the officers involved.

Time to Crack Down on Phishing and Other White-Collar Crimes

The majority of white-collar crimes such as advanced fee fraud, phishing or spoofing often go unreported. But when these crimes do make the news, it is because there are a large number of victims and a significant amount of money stolen.

Many law enforcement agencies do not have the trained personnel, funds, or advanced technology systems needed to adequately fight such crime. In addition, law enforcement agencies do not have the threat of severe penalties to deter people from committing such crimes. Often white-collar criminals risk committing such crimes because the fines or penalties are relatively minimal compared to the massive payoff potential. Read more about Utah's effort to create a White Collar Crime Registry (similar to sex offender registry) for convicted fraudsters.

One Assault, Two Crime Scenes: The Challenge of Handling Sexual Assault Cases

The importance of processing a sexual assault crime scene properly cannot be emphasized enough. Sexual assault cases are actually two crime scenes—one is the location of the occurrence and the other is the body of the victim. These scenes require not only a comprehensive crime scene search, but also swift examination and questioning of the victim. AMU professor Dena Weiss, a 17-year crime scene investigator (CSI), explains the various pieces of evidence a CSI is searching for and collecting as well as how police officers can help preserve key evidence in sexual assault cases.

Tips on How to Identify Potential Human Trafficking Victims

Human trafficking is modern-day slavery with victims providing labor or services through force, fraud or coercion. This crime is happening everywhere, from large cities to small towns around the world.

The true size of this problem is immeasurable, but the Northern Tier Anti-Trafficking Consortium (NTAC) estimates that 800,000 individuals are trafficked across international borders every year and 27 million people are enslaved across the world.