Home Tag "training for police officers"

Developing a Modernized Reserve Unit: Infrastructural Considerations

By Christopher L. McFarlin, J.D., Criminal Justice

Across the country, police departments continuously rely on units of reserve officers for a multitude of assignments. However, historically, there has always been a divide between full-time officers and reserve officers. This is, in large part, due to the fact that full-time police officers don’t see reserve officers as their equals. AMU criminal justice professor Christopher McFarlin writes about how agencies who intend to continue or increase their use of reserve officers must adapt a command and management structures, determine requirements of relevant state laws, and focus their attention on integrating reserve officers into the wider department.

Finding Advantage in Reality-Based Training (RBT) for Law Enforcement

The most effective way for a police officer to mentally and physically prepare for response during a stressful situation is to practice in an environment that is as close to reality as possible. Reality-based training (RBT) is a tool that law enforcement training supervisors should use to ensure their officers experience and deal with the mental and physical reactions experienced in high-stress situations so when they face a real situation, they are as prepared as possible. Here are two effective forms of simulated training to consider.

Elder Abuse: A Critical Issue for Law Enforcement

An 86-year-old woman’s adult son moves back in with his mother after a divorce. Unemployed with an alcohol and drug addiction, he starts using his mother’s ATM card at the corner liquor store to withdraw cash to pay off his heroin dealer. When the mother confronts her son about the missing money, he tells her she must be “losing it” and threatens to put her in a nursing home if she ever mentions this to anyone.

Law Enforcement Squad Stress Management: “Q-TIP” Theory Explained

By Mark Bond, professor of criminal justice at American Military University

Quit Taking It Personally (Q-TIP) is a tool to help reduce the adrenaline rush that often causes poor decision-making when officers find themselves in stressful situations (Bond, 1998).

Q-TIP theory was designed to be used as a code word to help officers stay focused when their body’s natural “fight or flight” defenses were activated.