Home Tag "prisons"

Prisons Going Green

With more than 2 million individuals incarcerated in federal and state prisons—the largest correctional population in the world—correctional facilities can play a large role in protecting the environment and sustaining natural resources for current and future generations. AMU criminal justice professor, Michael Pittaro, writes about the benefits of correctional facilities adopting environmentally sustainable "green" practices that can also save a considerable amount of money. Learn more about how correctional facilities can adopt green technologies.

Preparing Correctional Agencies for Technological Changes

Implementing an automation system within a correctional agency can be a challenging and complex process. AMU's Dr. Ron Wallace has extensive experience helping correctional facilities automate their processes and recommends administrators start with a business process reengineering (BPR) assessment. Learn more about BPR and what additional steps agencies should take before adopting or implementing new technology.

Making the Shift to Intelligence-Led Corrections

By Dr. Kelli Frakes

Intelligence-led policing (ILP) has been embraced by law enforcement as an effective tool, but intelligence-led practices remain limited in corrections, despite the fact that there is a wealth of information in correctional facilities. Dr. Kelli Frakes discusses why agencies need to identify the best methods to share information among agencies.

Prisoners’ Manipulation of Correctional Workers: Avoiding the Psychological Trap

On June 6, convicted murderers Richard Matt and David Sweat escaped from a maximum security prison in New York and remain at large, despite a massive nationwide manhunt involving local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies.

The primary suspect in assisting the prisoners’ elaborate escape plan is Joyce “Tillie” Mitchell, who worked in the prison as a tailor shop instructor. AMU'S Michael Pittaro discusses the ways inmates seek to manipulate corrections staff and the training needed to educate corrections officers so they do not fall prey to inmate manipulation tactics.

Should Prisoners be Entitled to Pell Grants to Help Pay for College?

On May 21, the Restoring Education and Learning (REAL) Act was introduced to Congress that would allow state and federal prisoners to receive Pell Grants for a college education, even while incarcerated. There were many reasons why Congress banned Pell Grants to prisoners back in 1994, so why would Congress consider overturning its original decision? AMU professor Michael Pittaro writes about why he opposes this legislation and how there's not enough research to demonstrate that higher education specifically reduces recidivism. If the Pell Grant program is to be extended, it should focus on providing more money to hard-working, law-abiding students.

Improve Your Facility by Changing Your Leadership Style

One might assume the greatest sources of stress for corrections officers are the threat of physical violence and hardships from working in an understaffed environment, right? As it turns out, those things are not causing officers the most stress. Instead, it is issues with prison administration and inconsistent leadership practices. AMU professor Michael Pittaro writes how prison administrators need to move away from punitive and authoritative styles of leadership and adopt a transformational leadership approach. Read how this style of leadership could help boost morale, improve job satisfaction, and even improve workplace safety. 

Marxism is Alive and Well in our Prison System

By Dr. Vincent Giordano, Program Director, Criminal Justice at American Public University

One theory of criminology that receives little attention in today’s criminal justice field is the theory of Marxist criminology. The general view today seems to be that after the collapse of communism in Russia and Eastern Europe, Marxist criminology has little value in our current criminal justice field.