Home Tag "prisoners"

A Year in Review: The Most Important Topics in Corrections

The field of corrections faces many impending changes as national leaders assess the country’s criminal justice system. To address such changes and their impact on correctional officers and administrators, In Public Safety has created an online magazine. This online publication addresses everything from dealing with mentally ill inmates to identifying human trafficking networks behind prison walls. 

Drug Abuse Recognition for Probation and Parole Officers

The majority of individuals in the nation’s criminal justice system have substance abuse issues. Suffice it to say, knowledge of drugs and their effects is very important to anyone working in the criminal justice system, especially those working in probation or parole.

To help officers determine if someone is under the influence of drugs, a group of officers in California developed a program called the drug abuse recognition (DAR) course. The DAR program was developed to help identify individuals currently under the influence of drugs, which makes it ideal for use by probation and parole officers, correctional officers, private industry, and school officials. AMU criminal justice student Keith Graves writes about the benefits of this unique program.

Prisoners’ Manipulation of Correctional Workers: Avoiding the Psychological Trap

On June 6, convicted murderers Richard Matt and David Sweat escaped from a maximum security prison in New York and remain at large, despite a massive nationwide manhunt involving local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies.

The primary suspect in assisting the prisoners’ elaborate escape plan is Joyce “Tillie” Mitchell, who worked in the prison as a tailor shop instructor. AMU'S Michael Pittaro discusses the ways inmates seek to manipulate corrections staff and the training needed to educate corrections officers so they do not fall prey to inmate manipulation tactics.

Should Prisoners be Entitled to Pell Grants to Help Pay for College?

On May 21, the Restoring Education and Learning (REAL) Act was introduced to Congress that would allow state and federal prisoners to receive Pell Grants for a college education, even while incarcerated. There were many reasons why Congress banned Pell Grants to prisoners back in 1994, so why would Congress consider overturning its original decision? AMU professor Michael Pittaro writes about why he opposes this legislation and how there's not enough research to demonstrate that higher education specifically reduces recidivism. If the Pell Grant program is to be extended, it should focus on providing more money to hard-working, law-abiding students.