Home Tag "police agencies"

Developing a Modernized Reserve Unit: Civil Liability Considerations

By Christopher L. McFarlin, J.D., Criminal Justice
Police agencies must consider the potential liability of having reserve officers who are undertrained, insufficiently equipped, or poorly screened. Some police agencies create a substantial contrast between their reserve officers and their full-time officers. It is essential for administrators to understand that the courts do not make this distinction when assessing liability. With no effective distinction in the views of the law or the public, agencies must hold their reserves to the same level of scrutiny as regular officers when hiring, terminating, training, and developing them.

Protect Your Agency with Use-of-Force Internal Investigations, Forms

Police leaders around the country want to make sure their department is not the next Ferguson. To avoid such a public firestorm, police chiefs need to improve their use-of-force policies and procedures. Even more importantly, chiefs need to institute use-of-force internal investigations, which include gathering evidence so that if a case goes to court, agencies are well prepared. Hear from an attorney, who has spent his career defending police agencies, share details about what he needs from agencies and officers after an incident.

Impact of Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Ruling on Criminal Justice Agencies

The recent U. S. Supreme Court ruling legalizing same-sex marriage in all 50 states will affect many areas of society, including all segments of the criminal justice system. While the full impact of this ruling will take some time to sort out, there are several immediate issues facing criminal justice agencies. AMU professor Ron Wallace discusses some of the issues that criminal justice agencies must address in light of this new court ruling.

Court Rules on Civilian Drones Used to Record Police

Unmanned aerial systems (UAS), more commonly known as drones, are increasingly popular devices used by citizens and law enforcement agencies alike. However, the regulations about operating drones remain undefined by the court system and the FAA. Police agencies around the country are evaluating and adopting new policies about how they operate drones as well as how they interact with citizens using such devices. Read about a recent court decision involving a man using a drone to record an active accident scene. What are the impacts of this ruling on police agencies?

Leading Change in Law Enforcement

Change does not typically go over well in law enforcement organizations. In general, people like to operate in their comfort zones and for many individuals, the way things are is just fine. These individuals know the rules, they know what they can and cannot do, and they can survive and succeed in such an environment. When something new is introduced it often upsets this delicate balance. However, change is necessary in all organizations and law enforcement leaders must do a better job of helping their officers accept and prosper during change.

Putting Experience to Work: The Value of a Formal Mentoring Program

Law enforcement agencies around the country have gotten smarter about who they hire and how they nurture individuals throughout their careers. One tool that has been proven to meet both goals is the development of formal mentoring programs for officers. Such programs can help increase the retention of new officers, help develop healthier officers, and improve agency morale. Learn how the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department (IMPD) built its mentoring program, how it uses mentoring in its recruiting efforts, and how its program has helped lower officer discipline rates by 40 percent.

Crime Mapping Technology and its Impact on Law Enforcement Intelligence

One of the most important technological advancements to enhance the capabilities of law enforcement is the use of crime mapping software, which allows agencies to track crimes occurring in a jurisdiction. By plotting what, when, and where crimes are occurring, law enforcement executives can use the resulting visual data to identify crime hotspots and use this information to allocate resources to areas of repeated criminal activity.