Home Tag "mental illness"

Getting to the Heart of Issues Behind Mass Shootings

After the deadly shooting at Umpqua Community College in Oregon, a very intelligent friend of mine posted a question on social media that got me thinking. He asked: “When are Americans going to do something about their angry 20-year-old white men with guns?” While such tragedies continue to incite the debate about gun control, it is important to remember that a gun is just a tool and such horrific incidents are perpetrated by people of all races. But there are common threads in many of these mass shootings, namely religion and mental illness. So how can average citizens help prevent such incidents? Start in your own community. Here's how.

Corrections System Fails Female Prisoners: One Woman’s Story

The number of females in prison, jail, and probation populations has grown at a considerably faster rate than males. Despite this growth, the correctional system is failing to address the rehabilitation needs of women during and after incarceration. AMU professor Michael Pittaro talks to one former inmate about her experience in the prison system and the support she's received now that she's on parole.

Unequal Disciplinary Actions for Officers After Shooting Deaths

In recent months, the news has been rife with stories about police officers shooting and killing civilians. While each incident has unique aspects, there are also commonalities. One question that remains unanswered by the law enforcement community is: If an investigation finds no criminal behavior by the victim, should disciplinary action be taken against the officer(s)? AMU professor Gary Minor examines this question and draws comparisons between two similar incidents that have very different outcomes for the officers involved.

Police Depression: The Silent Killer

By Mark Bond

Depression in police work is a silent killer. Depression can be stealthy, even for the most resilient officer, and can take a physical and mental toll on the mind and body if it goes unrecognized and untreated. Unfortunately, the silence within police culture discourages the acknowledgment of depression and mental illness. This silence cannot continue.