Home Tag "law enforcement agencies"

Obama Addresses Police Funding, Gun Control Laws, and Need for Reform at IACP

President Obama delivered a nearly hour-long address during the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) annual conference in an effort to gain support from law enforcement for his efforts to reform the criminal justice system and implement stricter gun-control laws. To build support from this skeptical audience, Obama delivered a speech that addressed many of the challenges police face and offered measures such as increasing budgets so agencies can hire more officers to focus on enhancing community relationships. Learn more about what Obama proposed to help police agencies across the nation. 

Making the Shift to Intelligence-Led Corrections

By Dr. Kelli Frakes

Intelligence-led policing (ILP) has been embraced by law enforcement as an effective tool, but intelligence-led practices remain limited in corrections, despite the fact that there is a wealth of information in correctional facilities. Dr. Kelli Frakes discusses why agencies need to identify the best methods to share information among agencies.

Impact of Supreme Court Same-Sex Marriage Ruling on Criminal Justice Agencies

The recent U. S. Supreme Court ruling legalizing same-sex marriage in all 50 states will affect many areas of society, including all segments of the criminal justice system. While the full impact of this ruling will take some time to sort out, there are several immediate issues facing criminal justice agencies. AMU professor Ron Wallace discusses some of the issues that criminal justice agencies must address in light of this new court ruling.

Pursuits, Use of Force, and the Influence of Public Perceptions on Policing

Some of us in law enforcement remember when high-speed pursuits were the order of the day. Patrol cars with powerful engines, great tires, and tuned suspensions were a warning to anyone who thought about trying to run from the police. Pursuits that involved police from multiple jurisdictions and covered long distances were fairly common.

Then, something happened.

Learn more about how public perception has driven change in policing and the battle currently being fought about police use of force.

Time to Crack Down on Phishing and Other White-Collar Crimes

The majority of white-collar crimes such as advanced fee fraud, phishing or spoofing often go unreported. But when these crimes do make the news, it is because there are a large number of victims and a significant amount of money stolen.

Many law enforcement agencies do not have the trained personnel, funds, or advanced technology systems needed to adequately fight such crime. In addition, law enforcement agencies do not have the threat of severe penalties to deter people from committing such crimes. Often white-collar criminals risk committing such crimes because the fines or penalties are relatively minimal compared to the massive payoff potential. Read more about Utah's effort to create a White Collar Crime Registry (similar to sex offender registry) for convicted fraudsters.

FAA Releases Policies for Unmanned Aerial System Use in the National Airspace System

This January, a personal unmanned aerial system (UAS) crashed on to the White House lawn. While the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) intended to bring forward new regulations for the public and commercial use of UAS in 2015, this incident seems to have accelerated the timetable. On February 15, the FAA released proposed rule changes. What are the key components of the new proposed regulations and how could it impact law enforcement agencies across the country?

Ferguson: A Community Held Prisoner by a Double-Sided Veil

The community of Ferguson is in turmoil and it’s not just because of recent protests and civil unrest. For many years, community members have felt they are part of a declining municipality and faced dramatic growth in the wealth gap separating rich and poor.

The cure in Ferguson is not simply seeking justice for Michael Brown, telling the truth, or justifying Officer Wilson’s actions. The cure will involve getting the community and police to act on fact, accept the judicial outcome, and then work to rebuild the disintegrated trust between the community and law enforcement.