Home Tag "Gary Minor"

Kim Davis, Religious Freedom and Accommodations

As Kim Davis heads back to court, human-resources staff and employment lawyers around the country are revisiting their policies and practices around accommodating workers’ religious beliefs and practices. Davis is the Rowan County, Kentucky clerk who refused to issue marriage certificates to same-sex couples, contending that doing so would contravene her religious beliefs. Religious accommodation requests occur in many public agencies, including police departments. AMU professor Gary Minor writes about cases involving religious accommodation requests and their impact law enforcement agencies.

Illegal Aliens and the 14th Amendment

With a new presidential election on the horizon, there is a growing group of candidates vying for the nation’s leading office. One of the main issues of discussion is the problem with illegal aliens, specifically those from Mexico. Some candidates would order deportation of all aliens and others would abolish citizenship rights for children born of illegal aliens. Based on these proposals, it seems that these candidates have little working knowledge of immigration law. AMU professor Gary Minor discusses laws and the Supreme Court rulings that impact citizenship.

Unequal Disciplinary Actions for Officers After Shooting Deaths

In recent months, the news has been rife with stories about police officers shooting and killing civilians. While each incident has unique aspects, there are also commonalities. One question that remains unanswered by the law enforcement community is: If an investigation finds no criminal behavior by the victim, should disciplinary action be taken against the officer(s)? AMU professor Gary Minor examines this question and draws comparisons between two similar incidents that have very different outcomes for the officers involved.

Use of Deadly Force on Fleeing Criminals

In the last few months, the news has been filled with stories about police officers shooting and killing unarmed fleeing criminals. Is it legal for officers to take such action? Under what circumstances can officers use deadly force on a fleeing suspect? AMU criminal justice professor, Gary Minor, writes about the legal rights of police officers to use lethal force.

Court Rules on Civilian Drones Used to Record Police

Unmanned aerial systems (UAS), more commonly known as drones, are increasingly popular devices used by citizens and law enforcement agencies alike. However, the regulations about operating drones remain undefined by the court system and the FAA. Police agencies around the country are evaluating and adopting new policies about how they operate drones as well as how they interact with citizens using such devices. Read about a recent court decision involving a man using a drone to record an active accident scene. What are the impacts of this ruling on police agencies?