Home Tag "emergency responders"

After-Action Report: Learning From Baltimore’s Response to Riots

Protests in modern society are very different from even a decade ago. Emergency planners and public safety leaders must understand that protests are not always locally driven and they must take an interpretative role to assess and protect protesters who have legitimate concerns from those with intent to insight riots. Striking this balance, as evidenced by the Baltimore riots, is not an easy task.

Read more about the June meeting of the Baltimore City Local Emergency Planning Committee, who met for the first time following the riots and civil unrest. Learn more about the chain of events that led up to the riots, which damaged or destroyed more than 300 stores, and the lessons learned from the city's unified response to this widespread civil unrest.

Tips for Adapting Response to Autistic Individuals

The number of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is on the rise. The CDC reports that 1 in 50 U.S. schoolchildren are diagnosed with ASD, which means more than 1 million children are diagnosed with some form of the neurodevelopment disorder. Considering a person with autism is seven times more likely than a non-autistic individual to need the service of responders, first responders must be prepared to encounter an autistic individual during an emergency situation. In recognition of April as Autism Awareness Month, here are some tips for how emergency responders can adjust response techniques.

Autism Awareness: 5 Steps to Adapt your Response

By Leischen Stelter, American Military University

The number of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is on the rise. In 2013, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report that 1 in 50 U.S. schoolchildren are diagnosed with ASD. That is up significantly from previous estimates of 1 in 88 children.

Duty to Act: Legal Obligations vs. Community Expectations

By Anthony S. Mangeri, Sr., Faculty Member, Emergency and Disaster Management at American Military University

Over the years, there have been several stories of public safety personnel, on and off duty, failing to meet the response expectations of their community. A recent incident in the District of Columbia involving the death of a man who collapsed near a fire station and not receive immediate aid, made it even more unclear if emergency responders have a legal duty to act versus an expectation by the community to aid those who seek help.

Sequestration and the impacts on law enforcement, firefighters and emergency services

The countdown towards sequestration continues. Most Americans, in all walks of life, are tired of hearing about this impending March 1 deadline, but alas, the impacts of these cuts could have significant impacts on those in public safety positions.

First off, here’s a quick review of sequestration, per CNN:

Sequestration is a series of automatic, across-the-board cuts to government agencies totalling $1.2 trillion over 10 years.