Home Tag "DV"

Victimology and Understanding Domestic Violence

With the rise in domestic violence, there is a greater need to understand why and to what extent certain individuals become victims of domestic violence. AMU's Dr. Jade Pumphrey discusses the study of victimology and why it's important to understand the role that victims play in their victimization and how this has led to some important legislation for victims.

What Constitutes Domestic Violence?

 When you hear the term domestic violence, if you are like many people, the image of a battered female with bruises is probably the first thing that comes to mind. However, domestic violence, or intimate partner violence (IPV) as it is now known, goes far beyond this one stereotype. Learn more about how domestic abuse can come in the form of physical and sexual abuse, as well as economic abuse, emotional abuse, and psychological abuse. 

Situational and Cultural Factors Influencing Intimate Partner Violence

Domestic violence often occurs as an acute incident at first, however, time and situational factors can increase the number of incidents as well as the level of violence. Data have shown that certain racial groups and socioeconomic groups are more susceptible to experiencing domestic violence. It's important for authorities to understand how IPV is influenced by situational and cultural factors so they can help identify individuals who are most susceptible to abuse and provide them with assistance and resources immediately.

The Need for a Robust Victim Assistance Program

Victim assistance programs (VAPs) are a critical component of any law enforcement agency. These services protect and promote the interests of victims, witnesses, families, and the community and provide support during and after an incident. Learn how agencies can institute robust victim services by working closely with community organizations and local volunteers.

Domestic Violence and Intimate Partner Violence: What’s The Difference?

The terms “domestic violence” and “intimate partner violence” are today used as synonymous terms to describe some form of abusive behavior by one individual upon another person in a relationship. While these two terms are used interchangeably to describe the same criminal offense, they have different origins. AMU's Dr. Ron Wallace writes about how the term “intimate partner violence” moved us away from the old view that abusive violence only occurs in marital relationships where the husband was the abuser and the wife was the victim. The concept of intimate partner violence acknowledges that abuse can exist in any type of personal intimate relationship, regardless of sexual orientation, marital status, or gender.

Interview Questions for Victims of Domestic Violence

By Dr. Gary Minor

Beginning in the mid-1980s, states nationwide began changing domestic violence laws and the criminal justice community began treating domestic violence on the same level as violence involving strangers. To accommodate these legislative changes, police agencies have had to refine how they investigate domestic violence cases. AMU criminal justice professor Gary Minor highlights two sets of questions that officers should ask victims to help build a case against an abuser.

What Does Domestic Violence Look Like?

The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV) reports that every minute, 20 people in the United States are victim of some form of physical abuse by an intimate partner. Victims of this crime can be of any gender, sexual orientation, age, or religion. Abuse can be physical, emotional, sexual, psychological, and/or economic in nature. AMU's Dr. Ron Wallace gives an overview of what you can do to learn more to help end domestic violence.