Home Tag "disaster preparedness"

It Takes a Community to Be Prepared for Disaster

On June 29, 2012, a derecho brought devastation to many Mid-Atlantic states including Ohio, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, New Jersey, and West Virginia and the District of Columbia. This incident highlighted the need for community preparedness, especially in rural areas. Dr. Shana Nicholson shares the lessons learned by small communities in West Virginia and how public safety agencies and citizens are working hard together so they're better prepared for the next disaster.

Preparing for a Disaster: How to Always Be Ready

What does it mean to be prepared for a disaster? With hurricane season upon us—coupled with all the other potential emergencies that exist in our communities—it is only fitting to discuss strategies for preparedness. While no emergency can be predicted, there are some general guidelines and supplies that individuals can have in order to be prepared when disaster strikes. AMU professor Giles Hoback provides tips on preparing for a disaster.

Budget Cuts Threaten EMS and Emergency Management Agencies

In the wake of the 2008 great recession, budgets and financial concerns have been at the forefront of policy making throughout the United States. Perhaps one of the most frustrating elements about working in emergency management and emergency medical services (EMS) are the constant threat of budget cuts. Citizens are also impacted by such budget cuts and many communities are facing cuts to their 9-1-1 emergency system. Read more from AMU professor Allison Knox about budget cuts and the impacts it has on public safety and emergency response.

Lessons Learned Five Years After the Gulf Oil Spill

It has been five years since an oil well in the Gulf of Mexico failed causing one of the worst environmental disasters in U.S. history. The emergency and disaster response to this spill had to be both immediate and sustained as the uncapped oil well, owned by BP, released an estimated 4.2 million barrels of oil for 87 straight days.

In this this podcast, Dr. Chris Reynolds, who was an EDM liaison with the U.S. Coast Guard and worked closely with the clean-up crews, provides insight about the lessons learned and the impacts on future disaster preparedness planning.