Home Tag "degrees in criminal justice"

Making the Transition from Officer to Educator, One Phase at a Time

Are you considering changing careers? AMU criminal justice professor, Dr. Ron Wallace, shares the different phases of his career and how he went from being a parole/probation officer to finding his next passion, which was providing technology solutions for correctional facilities. After a downturn in the economy, he decided to go back to school and the rest is history. What lessons can you learn from Dr. Wallace's experience changing careers?

Strong Teamwork Needed to Solve Violent Crimes

Despite what fictional crime dramas portray, violent crimes are never solved by a lone detective or a crime-sleuthing duo. Investigating violent crimes—and specifically homicides—requires extensive teamwork. AMU criminal justice professor Nicole Cain writes about the professionals involved in solving crimes including first responders, detectives, crime scene investigators, forensic scientists, medical examiners and more. Learn more about how these professionals have to work together to solve crimes.

Preparing Correctional Agencies for Technological Changes

Implementing an automation system within a correctional agency can be a challenging and complex process. AMU's Dr. Ron Wallace has extensive experience helping correctional facilities automate their processes and recommends administrators start with a business process reengineering (BPR) assessment. Learn more about BPR and what additional steps agencies should take before adopting or implementing new technology.

How to Pay for Your Criminal Justice Degree

Besides your house, one of the largest expenses you are likely to incur is paying for your college degree. Research studies show police officers who have earned a college degree demonstrate better overall job performance. But earning that degree can be expensive. Here are resources to help you pay for college including loans, grants, scholarships, employer assistance programs, and more.  

Law Enforcement Investigation Tools Expand Beyond DNA to Bacteria

For the past five years, forensic scientists have been taking advantage of their ability to collect Touch DNA, small samples of DNA from evidence that has been handled by suspects. However, new research has found that bacteria may be the next generation of forensic evidence used in police investigations. Learn more about key research studies focused on the benefits and feasibility of using bacterial fingerprints as evidence.