Home Tag "crime"

Use of Deadly Force on Fleeing Criminals

In the last few months, the news has been filled with stories about police officers shooting and killing unarmed fleeing criminals. Is it legal for officers to take such action? Under what circumstances can officers use deadly force on a fleeing suspect? AMU criminal justice professor, Gary Minor, writes about the legal rights of police officers to use lethal force.

Serving Our Country to Serving Time: The Rise and Value of Veteran Treatment Courts

Many of our veterans experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a result of trauma suffered during their military service. Such disorders can adversely influence a veteran’s ability to control behavior and can lead to impulsivity, disinhibition, anger, and aggression. Unfortunately, such behavior can contribute to veterans violating the law. Learn more about the creation of veteran treatment courts, which provide the criminal justice system a way to respond proactively by assisting veterans rather than punishing them.

Police Militarization: Reality, Hype, or Natural Evolution?

Tragic events such as the 2014 Michael Brown shooting in Ferguson, Mo. and the police-involved death of Eric Garner in New York City has spurred debate about whether or not police departments within the U.S. are becoming more militarized. The emphasis seems to be on the word “more,” implying that militarization is somehow a foregone conclusion and the question is how much more militarized they will become. Are these incidents evidence that police are increasingly militarized?

National Cyber Security Month: Protecting Children from Online Predators

By Michael Pittaro, assistant professor, criminal justice at American Military University

Sex offenders, particularly those who prey upon children and adolescents, are among the most feared criminals in society because they are masters in the art of manipulation and deception. Many possess sociopathic personalities and tendencies and they are incredibly difficult to profile because they often present themselves as charming, trustworthy and upstanding members of society.

How to Identify a Fraudster: Beware of the White-Collar Criminal, Turned Red-Collar Criminal

By Kim Miller, MSCJ, CFE, faculty member at American Military University

The term “white-collar crime” is derived from the assumption that business executives, wearing white shirts and ties, commit crimes. This term also theoretically distinguishes these types of crimes and criminals from those who commit physical crimes, which are supposedly more likely to be committed by “blue-collar criminals” (Miller, 2014).

Being an Ethical Warrior: How Labeling Theory Influences Police Officers and Their Patrol Perceptions

By Mark Bond, professor of criminal justice at American Military University

When police officers arrest someone, they often intentionally or unintentionally label that person as a deviant individual. Being labeled as a “bad guy” can actually perpetuate a person’s negative behavior, therefore, it’s important for police officers to recognize and understand the impacts of labeling theory.