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Law Enforcement Partnerships

The Lifesaving Power of Teamwork

If you work or aspire to work in the public safety field, being a team player is a necessity. Whether you’re a police officer, firefighter, EMT, or emergency manager, lives depend on the strength and unity of teams. And, in today’s world of complex threats, it’s not just how well one team works together, it’s how well teams from different agencies work together in a coordinated response.

In August, In Public Safety will feature articles written by American Military University faculty members investigating the ongoing shifts in teamwork and coordination efforts among public safety agencies.

NYPD’s Bratton Highlights Plan to Reinvent Policing

At the New York State Association of Chiefs of Police annual gathering of police chiefs from around the state, police commissioner of New York City William Bratton provided his perspective on the current state of policing in the country. “The last 18 months has been a time of extraordinary challenges and opportunities for the profession,” said Bratton. “We have a new world of issues that we need to deal with, but there’s an old world of issues that are resurfacing.”

Learn more about the NYPD's focus on five strategic areas, referred to as the "5 Ts", which will guide the agency in its continued fight against crime, while at the same time bridging the gap between police and minority communities.

Making the Shift to Intelligence-Led Corrections

By Dr. Kelli Frakes

Intelligence-led policing (ILP) has been embraced by law enforcement as an effective tool, but intelligence-led practices remain limited in corrections, despite the fact that there is a wealth of information in correctional facilities. Dr. Kelli Frakes discusses why agencies need to identify the best methods to share information among agencies.

After-Action Report: Learning From Baltimore’s Response to Riots

Protests in modern society are very different from even a decade ago. Emergency planners and public safety leaders must understand that protests are not always locally driven and they must take an interpretative role to assess and protect protesters who have legitimate concerns from those with intent to insight riots. Striking this balance, as evidenced by the Baltimore riots, is not an easy task.

Read more about the June meeting of the Baltimore City Local Emergency Planning Committee, who met for the first time following the riots and civil unrest. Learn more about the chain of events that led up to the riots, which damaged or destroyed more than 300 stores, and the lessons learned from the city's unified response to this widespread civil unrest.

Why Do Agencies Have Reserve Officers?

In the United States, there are more than 15,000 law enforcement agencies with less than 100 sworn personnel. In order to balance community needs with fiscal constraints, many departments have turned to reserve or part-time officers to complement full-time sworn personnel. However, when something like the incident in Tulsa, Oklahoma happens—a reserve deputy sheriff fatally shot an unarmed man—it is important to consider who these reserve officers are.

Tips for Joint Investigations with Military Criminal Investigation Organizations

Conducting a sexual assault investigation can be very complex, especially when military members are involved.  While military and civilian law enforcement investigative procedures are similar, there are some very important differences in protocol and procedure. Learn more about the differences in interrogations and questioning and how to work best with military criminal investigation organizations (MCIOs) to ensure the successful prosecution of military offenders in both the military and civilian realms.

When Modern-Day Slavery Hits Home

At a dark time in U.S. history, the trans-Atlantic slave trade was at its peak, with more than 12 million people shipped to various nations only to endure punishing labor on farms and in factories, building railroads, and more. “Slavery was abolished 150 years ago and yet there are more people in slavery today than in any other time in our history,” said American Public University System (APUS) professor Michael Pittaro. Today, there are an estimated 21 million victims worldwide and only a small percentage of these victims are reported to authorities.

Human trafficking is a local issue. Read more about why community stakeholders and citizens gathered in West Virginia to learn how to recognize and fight human trafficking at the local level.