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How K9 Training Has Changed Over Three Decades

By Leischen Stelter

For 28 of his 31 years in law enforcement, Robert Dougherty Jr. has worked with police dogs. When he started, most dogs were trained as single-purpose patrol K9s, but today the majority of police departments have adopted cross-training programs so dogs are proficient in several areas of detection. Learn how agencies have changed their training programs for dogs and handlers.

How To Become the Best Dope Cop In Your Department

By Keith Graves, Criminal Justice
At some point in your law enforcement career, you choose a path to follow. This path leads you to a type of policing that you enjoy and can hopefully get a special assignment in, so you can pursue this interest. For me, I chose narcotics investigations. Here are five steps to become the best dope cop in your department.

Developing a Modernized Reserve Unit: Civil Liability Considerations

By Christopher L. McFarlin, J.D., Criminal Justice
Police agencies must consider the potential liability of having reserve officers who are undertrained, insufficiently equipped, or poorly screened. Some police agencies create a substantial contrast between their reserve officers and their full-time officers. It is essential for administrators to understand that the courts do not make this distinction when assessing liability. With no effective distinction in the views of the law or the public, agencies must hold their reserves to the same level of scrutiny as regular officers when hiring, terminating, training, and developing them.

Drug Abuse Recognition for Probation and Parole Officers

The majority of individuals in the nation’s criminal justice system have substance abuse issues. Suffice it to say, knowledge of drugs and their effects is very important to anyone working in the criminal justice system, especially those working in probation or parole.

To help officers determine if someone is under the influence of drugs, a group of officers in California developed a program called the drug abuse recognition (DAR) course. The DAR program was developed to help identify individuals currently under the influence of drugs, which makes it ideal for use by probation and parole officers, correctional officers, private industry, and school officials. AMU criminal justice student Keith Graves writes about the benefits of this unique program.