Home Career Don’t Let the Holidays Fizzle Your Physical Fitness Regimen

Don’t Let the Holidays Fizzle Your Physical Fitness Regimen

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By Leischen Stelter, editor of In Public Safety

November is the time of the year when health regimens tend to get tossed aside in favor of all the preparations and indulgences that go along with the upcoming holiday season. But for public safety professionals, being in good physical shape is not an option. Whether you’re a police officer, firefighter, intelligence analyst, emergency manager, or emergency medical professional, your physical health and strength are critical to your job performance.

Physical Health_TreadmillWe all know it’s not easy to keep physical health a top priority. Many public safety professionals work long hours and alternating shifts, which leads to irregular sleep patterns, poor eating habits, and minimal time for exercise. But not taking the time to focus on your physical health through exercise and eating habits can be detrimental to your career and impede your job performance.

So this month, In Public Safety, asked faculty members, staff, alumni, and students with public safety backgrounds to write about strategies for maintaining physical health. Many faculty members reported that focusing on exercise and strength-building were not only important for their physical health, but also for their mental wellbeing. Exercise was another way to help them cope with the stress of their profession and keep them mentally focused and fit.

Below are articles to inspire and guide public safety professionals to keep physical health a high priority now and throughout their entire career.

Ginny HaddockPhysical Health for Strong Critical Thinking Skills

AMU’s Ginny Haddock writes about how physical health is particularly essential to intelligence professionals. It could be the difference between making an accurate judgement at a critical moment or not.

 

Shana nicholson_FireTruck_pic_SMBeyond the Scene: Focus on Exercise and Hobbies to Lower Stress

Firefighting and public safety careers are stressful professions and those who work in public safety must adopt positive coping skills. AMU professor Dr. Shana Nicholson writes about the importance of maintaining outside hobbies and focusing on physical fitness to help manage stress.

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